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Dog TrainingPuppies

The Art of raising a puppy

  •  THE ART OF RAISING A PUPPY book review

The Monks of latest Skete THE ART OF RAISING A PUPPY books reviews The authors of the classic guide the way to Be Your Dog's ally now tell you everything you would like to understand about the crucial first months of your puppy's life. From the choice to adopt a pup through the sensible steps of selecting the proper breed, preparing your home, caring for your new charge, and practicing basic obedience exercises, the Monks of latest Skete offer clear, compassionate guidelines for raising a puppy. Renowned for breeding German shepherds, the Monks train their own beautiful dogs, and dogs of any breed, consistent with a singular program supported understanding raising canine behavior and enhancing the bond between puppy and owner. This communion begins in puppyhood and is predicated on deep respect and affection. Improper care, poor training, or a scarcity of attention during the first months can cause problem behaviors that become increasingly difficult to change as your puppy matures. By learning to softly assert your dominance from the beginning , you'll build an enduring and loving relationship together with your pup. this whole guide, illustrated with quite eighty black-and-white photographs, explains the stages of puppy development, the way to communicate together with your pup, the way to begin an entire educational program , and the way to affect common problems like chewing, jumping up, and paper-training. the type of fulfillment a solid relationship together with your pup can bring is demonstrated within the stories of three dogs who have assumed special places in their owners lives. The Art of Raising a Puppy is an important source of wisdom, information, and inspiration for anyone who loves and cares for a puppy. As a community, the Monks of latest Skete are breeding, raising, and training dogs for quite twenty years. New Skete Monastery is found in Cambridge, New York.


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  • The Art of Raising Puppies

Raising puppies is perhaps easiest once they inherit a replacement home at about 12 weeks aged. they have been weaned by this point, and are sufficiently old to be removed great from the litter. If you bring home a younger puppy, especially if it hasn't skilled the stage of socializing with other dogs (its siblings), and to some extent humans raise, you would possibly have a puppy healthy that's difficult to boost, and one which as an adult, are going to be difficult to handle. An older puppy, and one that has not yet been through obedience training excellent, can bring a completely find different set of problems with it, though these can usually be overcome. Picture a 6-month old retriever puppy, which has had no training to talk of, and you get the thought of what you would possibly be facing.

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But, we're talking about younger and smaller puppies to start with. it is often an honest idea if you'll get familiar with the puppy before bringing it into your home. Visit the breeder several times so you'll spend little time with the puppy, and handle it to the extent it's comfortable in your presence. Then, by the time you bring it home, it's probably quite willing to accompany you.


  • Some technical advice on raising your puppy

When it's 12 weeks aged and even younger, you'll start housebreaking a puppy. Some breeds take longer than others, and you will need to show patience. it's extremely important that you simply never allow yourself to urge angry with a little puppy. they're fragile, not only physically, but mentally also. once you play with them, even once you pick them up, do so gently and hold them securely and comfortably. it is vital initially (and always for that matter) to spend time with the puppy. If you do not have the time to spare, you should not be bringing a replacement puppy into your home.

Raising puppies means raising healthy puppies, and you will want to start your puppy out on special puppy food. ask the breeder, or to a veterinarian, to seek out out what food would be best. Generally, you will need to be feeding a puppy small portions 3 to 4 times each day initially, gradually working towards twice each day feedings when the puppy reaches the age of 5 to six months. shortly after you've brought the puppy into your home, schedule a visit with the local veterinarian for an exam and shots. ask the breeder first, to ascertain what shots, if any, the puppy already has had.

Housebreaking may be a major part of raising puppies. it is vital to spend sufficient time with the puppy, so that it learns, as early as possible, the art of where to travel and when to allow you to know it is time. it'll be easier on both you and therefore the puppy if you're taking a consistent approach regarding where and when to travel. Consistency will make the training process for the puppy that much easier. Once the puppy knows the right spot for it to travel, it'll generally be very reluctant to travel elsewhere. there'll be accidents - many initially, then decreasing in number and frequency, probably sooner than you'll expect.

A 12-week old puppy is prepared to play, and by that age has also usually has developed a high degree of curiosity. meaning it's time to purge some toys, especially some chew toys, at an equivalent time beginning to train it on what it can chew on and what it shouldn't (having chew toys helps here). The chew toys also are healthy as far because the puppy's teeth are concerned. We mentioned curiosity. meaning you will have to stay an eye fixed on your puppy whenever it isn't during a safe enclosed area. Puppies haven't learned what's good for them and what's not, nor where dangers may lurk, and you do not necessarily want them to find out those lessons the hard way. Raising puppies means quite just food and shelter. you've got to offer them protection also. it'll be work on times, and frustrating sometimes, but raising puppies is more often than not a pure joy.


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